Master of Arts in Counseling

Ninety-five percent of Carroll counseling grads pass state exam

December 16, 2019
Dr. Scott Floyd and Jennifer Cranford

None of our folks are going to fall through the cracks… We want our students to receive licensure so they can serve in counseling centers, state agencies, and so on.

IRVING, Texas (09 December 2019) — Ninety-five percent of counseling students at the B. H. Carroll Theological Institute in Irving, Texas, have passed the state’s Licensed Professional Counseling exam since the program began nine years ago, the program’s director said following the licensure of its latest graduate.

Counseling students are required to pass the exam after graduation if they intend to pursue counseling in a public setting outside of a Christian ministry. Once passed, the counselor is designated an “LPC-Intern.” Another 3,000 hours of counseling are required before the intern receives full licensure in Texas.

Scott Floyd, who directs the counseling program and has taught counseling for more than 25 years, said the personal attention counseling students receive at Carroll is fundamental in preparing them for the exam.

“None of our folks are going to fall through the cracks,” Floyd said. “We want our students to receive licensure so they can serve in counseling centers, state agencies, and so on. The benefit of our program is, of course, that students are getting an integrated program. There is good theology with a strong biblical basis combined with a deep knowledge of psychology.”

Jennifer Cranford is the latest B. H. Carroll Theological Institute graduate to pass the licensure exam with the State of Texas. She said she loved “the small group attention” received from experienced faculty members who were committed to balancing professional practice with a Christian worldview.

“Many Christian programs shut out the professional side, but all of the different counseling modalities and best practices currently in place are used at Carroll,” Cranford said. “We get to study with great minds and with people who love Jesus.”

Cranford will begin her work as a counseling intern with Restoration Counseling in Fort Worth in January.

Gene Wilkes, president of the Carroll Institute, said the number of students passing the state licensure exam on the first attempt is significant.

“We prepare well those who are seeking licensure with the state in counseling. Our success rate is as good–if not better–than any other program,” Wilkes said. “If you want to pursue counseling, Carroll is the place for that. This latest success story is another example of that.”

Students who enroll in the master of arts in counseling program can choose between two tracks, one which focuses on preparation for state LPC licensure and one geared toward counseling in a ministry setting. Licensure is not required for a ministry setting, but many students in ministry still pursue state licensure.

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